Culture » Overview

exploring the transformative power of the arts – building bridges across cultures – supporting young cultural innovators

The Salzburg Global Seminar’s Culture and the Arts Program focuses on the transformative power of the arts, facilitates cultural exchange at multiple levels, and provides capacity-building opportunities through the annual Young Cultural Innovators Forum. Through multi-year projects and strategic convenings, the Culture and Arts Program seeks to secure a more prominent role for the arts on policy agendas and to support the continuously evolving needs of the creative sector – as a major driver of sustainable economic development and social improvement – through the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.

 

Sessions in 2017:

The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal 
February 7 to 12, 2017 

Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovators Forum: Regional Fellows Event
April 27 to 29, 2017

Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV
October 14 to 19, 2017

For past sessions, click here


Pavlos Georgiadis - Our Generation has a Unique Opportunity
Pavlos Georgiadis at Session 561 | Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability
Pavlos Georgiadis - Our Generation has a Unique Opportunity
Patrick Wilson 
Pavlos Georgiadis, Fellow of Session 561 | Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability, has appeared on FM4 radio to talk where our food comes from and what it means to us. He talked about enriching our lives by making informed choices about food by understanding where our food comes from and being conscious about our consumption. Georgiadis is an ethnobiologist, AgriFood author, and film maker. Born and raised in Alexandroupolis, Greece, he has lived in eleven countries in Europe, Asia, and America, working on research projects for biodiversity conservation, sustainable development, and rural extension. He is an active social entrepreneur in the agro-ecological sector. He also created the single varietal extra virgin olive oil Calypso and established a consultancy company called We Deliver Taste. He also talks about the pleasure that comes from making better food choices and the food revolution that comes from the pleasure of preparing and enjoying food that is good for us. The full interview is available to listen to below.
More interviews with Fellows from Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability can be found on the session page: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/561.
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Prairie Rose Seminole - Keeping up with Traditions is Becoming a Dying Art
Prairie Rose Seminole speaking at Session 561 | Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability.
Prairie Rose Seminole - Keeping up with Traditions is Becoming a Dying Art
Patrick Wilson 
Prairie Rose Seminole, Fellow of Session 561 | Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability has been featured on a segment for FM4 radio about taking a more conscious approach to food and maintaining traditions. Seminole talked about her Native American heritage and how her ancestors and she forages in nature to help provide for herself and her tribe. She also talked about the medicinal properties of plants and grass in nature that have been forgotten by the general population. Seminole is a prevention specialist for the Boys and Girls Club of the Three Affiliated Tribes in New Town, ND, USA. She is a citizen of the Three Affiliated Tribes of North Dakota, a descendant of the Sahnish/Arikara, Northern Cheyenne and Lakota Nations, and a member of the Waterbuster Clan. Ms. Seminole believes in and emphasizes the interconnected nature of humanity and faith, and the responsibility we all have to ensuring social justice. Lifting up teachings from her parents, traditional gardening, wild food, and medicine harvesting have become Seminole’s lifeway. She spoke to Salzburg Global about her close work with food and the importance of understanding the cultural practices surrounding food. You can read the full interview with Salzburg Global here. The full interview is available to listen to below. #
More interviews with Fellows from Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability can be found on the session page: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/561.
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Salzburg Global Collaboration Creates Photography Exhibit at FOTOHOF
Herman Seidl and Tanya Kiang at the opening of the FOTOHOF exhibit on Contemporary Photography from Ireland.
Salzburg Global Collaboration Creates Photography Exhibit at FOTOHOF
Patrick Wilson 
A new photography exhibit is now open at the FOTOHOF Gallery thanks to collaboration between Salzburg Global Seminar Fellows. The Contemporary Photography from Ireland exhibit, in collaboration with the Gallery of Photography in Dublin, features several displays by seven contemporary fine art photographers from Ireland as well as twenty topical photo books from Ireland that capture different aspects of both Irish culture, history and heritage. The origins of the collaboration began from a chance meeting between fellows at Session 502 | Power in Whose Palm? The Digital Democratization of Photography. Tanya Kiang, Director/Curator at the Gallery of Photography, Dublin and Herman Seidl, freelance photographer as well as staff member and curator at the FOTOHOF, spoke to Salzburg Global at the opening of the exhibit about how their meeting at the session inspired the collaboration and brought the work of these Irish artists to Salzburg. “There were some really fantastic sessions in the seminar itself but it was quite cloistered,” Kiang said. “You stayed in the Schloss and you were in the sessions from morning to night time, it was exhausting. At one point during one of the sessions Herman made an intervention and he played a very lovely photo piece by Duane Michals. It really lifted my heart. We’d been talking about these very important and serious things and then there was finally some visual pleasure going on. We were all kind of lifted by it I think. Immediately after that day’s meeting there was an opening of a photography exhibit at the FOTOHOF which the seminar Fellows were invited to. As soon as I walked into the FOTOHOF I went right up to Herman and said something is going to happen. He must have thought, who is this crazy Irish girl?” “I remember Tanya not being just satisfied with that one visit,” said Seidl. “She came back another day and went through all the book productions we have done so far. At first we didn’t have any major intentions but then over the course of two years we kept meeting at photo scene meets in Europe in festivals in places like Paris. Then it was the Solas Photography Prize that really got us talking, where you made me a panel judge. We wanted to share these amazing artists across borders and bring their work to the FOTOHOF here in Salzburg.” Tanya believes the Irish Photography scene is in a strong place and has many aspects that allow for a thriving photographic culture including great undergraduate and postgraduate courses and exhibition spaces. As well as this, the many social changes happening in Ireland have created a fluid and energetic environment that she believes comes across in the several exhibits. As part of the collaboration, artists from Salzburg will also be featured in an exhibit at the Gallery of Photography in Dublin, Ireland. Kiang and Seidl believed the cultural exchange was invaluable for our shared culture. “If you don’t have something comparative happening you’re just going to sink into a morass of nothing.” Kiang said. “The more points of reference you can make the more we can work out our differences and similarities and break down the boundaries we put around ourselves. There are so many things that Austria and Ireland have in common. Ireland and Austria look to each other for foreign policy commonalities more so than other big blocks in the European Union.” Seidl finished by praising Salzburg Global’s ability to create collaborations like this exhibit and the power it has as a tool for learning. “When I’ve photographed some of the sessions, I’ve been totally taken back by the topics and it’s so much fun to be there and be part of it. You never stop learning, that’s the thing about it. You always have new experiences and new encounters. To me international encounters are the only way to break out of our comfort zones and expand our minds. If you wouldn’t move out of Austria or Ireland you would never expand your mind. The intercultural interactions that Salzburg Global provides are totally mind blowing and important for our collective cultural growth.” The exhibit is available to view at the FOTOHOF gallery until April 28, 2016.
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Grants Awarded to Innovative Arts & Sustainability Projects
The winners of the "particle accelerator" grants (clockwise from top left) Roesch, Flörkemeier, Intrachooto and Toutikian
Grants Awarded to Innovative Arts & Sustainability Projects
Salzburg Global Staff 
Salzburg Global Seminar in collaboration with the David Rockefeller Fund has granted “particle accelerator grants” to two projects borne of connections made at Session 561 | Beyond Green The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability. The spirit of collaboration and innovation that characterized the gathering in Salzburg will be taken forward in the form of two projects emerging from the gathering, selected from twenty post-session project submissions. The projects are: “Creative Sustainability Workshops at Universities” to be implemented by Anaïs Roesch and Torben Flörkemeier, and “Beirut Design Week meets Scrap Lab” to be implemented by Doreen Toutikian and Singh Intrachooto. The “Creative Sustainability Workshops at Universities” project aims to create a pan-European network of young professionals to develop and facilitate workshops at the art-culture-sustainability interface.  The target groups of these workshops are students in art schools, graduate programs focused on sustainability, and cultural management programs. The “particle accelerator” grant will go towards a preparatory workshop in July 2016 organized by Roesch and Flörkemeier that will bring ten artists, cultural managers, and sustainability scholars together to build a network and design an interactive one-day workshop that can be implemented over the course of the following year in university settings across Europe.  The “Beirut Design Week meets Scrap Lab” project will support the participation of Intrachooto - Founder of Scrap Lab and Head of the Creative Center for Eco-Design - in the Beirut Design Week in May 2016, which is organized by MENA Design Research Center, of which Toutikian is the director. The grant will also enable Intrachooto to conduct a workshop with youth groups, architecture students, and design professionals to develop sustainable and recycled materials for larger scale projects in Lebanon. While in Beirut, Intrachooto will map existing infrastructure and help guide the development of strategic sustainable projects that focus on the needs of the Lebanese waste crisis. "Salzburg Global is delighted to facilitate these two projects as immediate outcomes from the Beyond Green session," said Salzburg Global Program Director Susanna Seidl-Fox. "We also looks forward to continue collaborating with all session participants and the Arts and Sustainability network that has emerged from the gathering in Salzburg."  
The Salzburg Global session Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability is part of Salzburg Global’s long-running Culture and the Arts series. The session is supported by the Edward T. Cone Foundation, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, the Bush Foundation, the David Rockefeller Fund and Red Bull Amaphiko. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/561.
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Living Arts in Post Conflict Contexts Forum: Practices, Partnerships, Possibilities
Tuol Sleng Museum - picture by Phalinn Ooi
Living Arts in Post Conflict Contexts Forum: Practices, Partnerships, Possibilities
Patrick Wilson 
A landmark collaboration with Cambodian Living Arts and Salzburg Global Seminar Living Arts in Post Conflict Contexts Forum: Practices, Partnerships, Possibilities took place between March 10 to 12 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The three day event, sponsored by the Prince Claus Fund for Culture and Development, connected arts activators and change makers from twenty countries and drew together insights from Salzburg Global's multi-year programs on Culture, the Arts and Society, Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention, and the Young Cultural Innovators Forum.  Just over 40 years ago, the Khmer Rouge regime launched its genocidal regime in which nearly 2 million Cambodians died – including 90% of the artists working in the country. In 2016, with 60% of the country’s population under 25, Cambodia’s first post-genocide generation has the opportunity to work with and through the arts to rebuild community, renew unique cultural traditions, and foster resilience and economic innovation. This three-day workshop addressed critical challenges faced by many countries during and after mass atrocities by exploring ways to overcome mistrust, preserve heritage and collective identity, and build supportive partnerships with government and other organizations.  Participants created the basis for an international network of advocates using the arts to transform pre and post conflict societies, advanced the notion of culture as a vehicle for peace and promoted dialogue as a driver for inclusive development. In addition to the workshop, Salzburg Global hosted a special evening event at Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum entitled "Place of Memory." The museum is a former high school where some 17,000 people were imprisoned and tortured during the Khmer Rouge regime from its rise to power in 1975 to its fall in 1979. Panelists, including Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Claire Shine, guided discussions that were informed by Salzburg Global's highly-respected work on Holocaust and Genocide education and remembrance, through which we have built a major international network to foster dialogue, promote tolerance, and share knowledge and resources. Both Salzburg Global and Cambodia Living Arts will be posting more information on our respective sites and are proud to have partnered together to create a means of dialogue and networking to aid conflict transformation and avoid the mistakes of our pasts. For more information see: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/Fellow56
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A Workshop, a "Canvas", a New Language and New Ethics
The Fellows and staff of Session 561 | Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability
A Workshop, a "Canvas", a New Language and New Ethics
Patrick Wilson 
For five days, 58 participants from 28 different countries came together at Salzburg Global Seminar for the program: Beyond Green: The Arts as Catalyst for Sustainability. After intense and often contentious discussions, Fellows concluded the session with proposals for new ways the arts can be a catalyst for sustainability, ranging from a workshop and a "canvas" to a new language and new ethics. Practitioners and thinkers, all committed to promoting social, economic, and environmental sustainability through the arts and cultural innovation, convened at Schloss Leopoldskron for a series of discussions and group work that aimed to foster innovative strategic approaches to achieve greater and longer-term impact in sustainability goals. Over the course of the five-day program, daily sessions saw participants present successful projects they had worked on, as well as project failures and pitfalls, with the aim to help their peers see what areas can be improved upon or avoided in their own endeavors. Other panels focused on ways to improve the spreading of messages such as a presentation on the way the human brain retains memories and ideas, while another considered the role design has to play in advancing sustainability. A major theme of the talks throughout the session was the power of the arts to both raise awareness of social injustices and to generate public engagement and bolder policymaking to help find solutions. The underprivileged and major events often can go under the radar of the general public, and the discussions encouraged those working in the arts to tell these stories and raise awareness. Another key talking point was an attempt to redefine the term “development.” One Fellow felt the term development has become “poisonous” with many lamenting the way development has been focused for too long on economic growth rather than other aspects such as cultural growth. Fellows remarked that such a narrow-minded focus was not helping to achieve sustainable development as one Fellow said: “It’s a very one dimensional view for a multi-dimensional problem.” Stigmas of a narrowly focused economic development viewpoint were also discussed as one Fellow said: “Economy has become so hegemonic that people think if you’re not developed economically, you’re not developed in any other fields of life.” Fellows hoped to use the arts to help expand the term development by raising awareness of the developed cultures of developing countries and making culture a greater focus on development agendas. Following the diverse input from the plenary discussions, the Fellows also convened in small groups to work together. One group explored the role of the “creative industries” (an admittedly contentious term), with many calling for the shift in consumer behaviors to think about responsible sourcing and fair labor practices, with key idea being moving from “extractivism” to “regenerativism.” This change of ideology encompasses a broad spectrum of issues from food systems and the fashion industry to health and social cohesion, and decentralized economies and the commons. The Fellows believed there needed to be a profound change with one Fellow remarking: “We need a new language and new ethics.” Other groups, in addition to holding some in-depth and introspective discussions, put forward plans to develop new tools and approaches for future work and collaboration. One such proposal was a post-session follow-on workshop to expand and strengthen new alliances for sustainability. The group admitted that they needed intermediary characters outside of the art field to have greater impact on change, and sought to facilitate this through their workshops.  Raising awareness and engaging the public was the focus of the second project proposal. The Fellows acknowledged a need for inclusive communication to engage stakeholders and the public by focusing on creative changemakers. The Fellows believed there was a lack of communication between sectors, and understanding how to approach and engage stakeholders is vital. To achieve this aim they proposed a “Creative Communication Canvas” tool (possibly an app or a website) that would enable effective communication, the ability to build relationships and create inclusivity amongst partners. The challenges facing the idea included the need for greater research and creating wording that can be globally understood as well as a broad scope in the concept. The Fellows intended to follow up after this Salzburg Global Seminar program by addressing these challenges, identifying partners by leveraging personal networks, and promoting cross-sector involvement. With projects still in their early stages and huge tasks and questions facing the participants as they left, they took an African saying to heart: “Until the lion finds their storyteller, hunters will always be portrayed as the hero.” 
The Salzburg Global session Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability is part of Salzburg Global’s long-running Culture and the Arts series. The session is supported by the Edward T. Cone Foundation, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, the Bush Foundation and Red Bull Amaphiko. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/561
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“Has ‘development’ become a poisonous word?”
Fellows speaking at Session 561 | Beyond Green:
“Has ‘development’ become a poisonous word?”
Patrick Wilson 
“The word ‘development’ was an economic term but economy has become so hegemonic that people think if you’re not developed economically, you’re not developed in any other fields of life. For me this is simply wrong... That’s why I think the term ‘sustainable development’ is poisonous; its meaning has been nailed to growth rate. The economic idea has even been used to measure other parts of life which is wrong.”
Marco Kusumawijaya Director, Rujak Center for Urban Studies, Jakarta, Indonesia
(Read our full interview) “Development is now in many ways considered a bad word, also in Asia. We need to work out how to make people understand the value of sustainable development. In many ways we are very romantic about the past but it is coming to the point where you have to see the urgency to have change.”
Margaret Shiu Founder & Director, Bamboo Curtain Studio, Taipei, Taiwan “It’s an interesting point because I’m interested in the redefinition of the word development rather than thinking of it as economic development. We should start thinking of it as a holistic human development and what does it mean to invest in holistic individual societal development and evolutionary development.”
Alexis Frasz Researcher & Strategist, Helicon Collaborative, New York, NY, USA “Nowadays, not only in Argentina but all over the world, development is still very much connected with growth of GDPs and economic development and that is exactly the disease. It’s a very one dimensional view for a multi-dimensional problem. I think we still don’t understand what the goal is, economic growth could be important but it is not the goal. The goal of development is for people to flourish.”
Christian Tiscornia Biaus Founder & President, Amartya Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Salzburg Global session Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability is part of Salzburg Global’s long-running Culture and the Arts series. The session is supported by the Edward T. Cone Foundation, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, the Bush Foundation and Red Bull Amaphiko. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/561. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGSculture.
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VOICES FROM YOUNG CULTURAL LEADERS

How should cultural institutions approach the creation and articulation of value?
Albino Jopela, archaelogist and lecturer at Eduardo Mondlane University in Mozambique suggests that considering the values of all of the stakeholders in a community will help ensure relevance and sustainability.


Why is it important for arts leaders to engage in cross-cultural conversations?
Jimena Lara Estrada, program coordinator for the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York, talks about connecting with other leaders and the hope that it instills.

How do you articulate value of arts in a society where it is largely seen as a commodity?
Eyad Houssami, founding director of Masrah Ensemble in Lebanon, talks about the challenges of making a case for the arts in a society where the concept of public value is very limited.

What role should orchestras play in their communities?
Mark Gillespie, general and artistic manager of Orchestra of the Americas and Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders Fellow, suggests that orchestras should connect with youth at a very early age so that musicians grow out of the community.