Culture » Overview

exploring the transformative power of the arts – building bridges across cultures – supporting young cultural innovators

The Salzburg Global Seminar’s Culture and the Arts Program focuses on the transformative power of the arts, facilitates cultural exchange at multiple levels, and provides capacity-building opportunities through the annual Young Cultural Innovators Forum. Through multi-year projects and strategic convenings, the Culture and Arts Program seeks to secure a more prominent role for the arts on policy agendas and to support the continuously evolving needs of the creative sector – as a major driver of sustainable economic development and social improvement – through the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.

 

Sessions in 2017:

The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal 
February 7 to 12, 2017 

Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovators Forum: Regional Fellows Event
April 27 to 29, 2017

Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV
October 14 to 19, 2017

For past sessions, click here


Francisco Gómez Durán: “It’s important to promote cultural industries”
Francisco Gómez Durán: “It’s important to promote cultural industries”
Oscar Tollast 
An associate expert at UNESCO has praised Salzburg Global for its strategy session on ‘Promoting the Next Generation of Cultural Entrepreneurs: Planning for Success’. Francisco Gómez Durán, who works in the promotion of cultural and creative industries in developing countries, attended the recent session alongside 27 other leading thinkers. Mr Gómez Durán has developed cultural initiatives and coordinated international cooperation projects with the United Nations Development Programme. He described cultural entrepreneurship as an “essential part and component” in the promotion of cultural and creative industries. “Always keep in mind that cultural and creative industries are drivers of economic development [and] social inclusion. We should be tapping into the available resources.” During the three-day session, participants discussed the qualities of a cultural entrepreneur and the programs needed to support the work of these people and how to empower them. They shared their experiences and thoughts for the benefit of designing a new program evolving from the 2012 Young Cultural Leaders Forum. Whilst differing definitions were aired, participants agreed on a set of qualities cultural entrepreneurs shared regardless of the institution that they worked for. Mr Gómez Durán explained his role and his latest project working for UNESCO’s International Fund for Cultural Diversity. “We support non-governmental organizations and governmental authorities to develop policies, strategies and action plans that develop cultural and creative industries. “We are, for example, developing a lot of mapping studies that are coming up with very interesting and relevant information that was somehow hidden or not available to relevant stakeholders. “We think that it’s important to promote cultural industries and give operators the means to further develop their activities.” Mr Gómez Durán has also worked with the Spanish International Development Cooperation Agency in India, Malaysia and Brazil. He revealed to Salzburg Global some of the challenges the cultural sector faced in developing countries. “I think there is a big need for tools and for mechanisms in order to allow development in developing countries. “There is a lack of information, a lack of data [and] a lack of resources in order to professionalize the sector.” Mr Gómez Durán said cultural organizations needed access to higher education and tailor-made programs to strengthen their capacities. “We need to convey the message why culture is important and why culture is a driver of development and social economic development. We need to work more on that.” Making his first appearance at Salzburg Global Seminar, Mr Gómez Durán was keen to take away ideas to relate to his work at UNESCO. “I think the best thing that I will bring back to Paris is the possibility of meeting all these amazing people, working at different levels, coming from different backgrounds and organizations.” He described the strategy session as “unique” due to the diversity of participants attending and suggested the richness of ideas and opinions will help develop Salzburg Global’s program within the next 10 years. “I think it’s very important what these different actors have to say, what is their vision, their needs and challenges, [and] expectations. “We are here together, exchanging different ideas, experiences, [and] points of view that I think are going to be very relevant in our future work.”
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Young Cultural Leaders return to critique new 10-year program plan
Young Cultural Leaders return to critique new 10-year program plan
Oscar Tollast 
Several participants from the 2012 Young Cultural Leaders Forum have returned to offer their help for a new Salzburg Global program. They were joined by leading thinkers and practitioners for a strategy session entitled, ‘Promoting the Next Generation of Cultural Entrepreneurs: Planning for Success’. In the past three days, participants have engaged in creative idea development and have been sharing experiences and lessons for the benefit of the program design. Salzburg Global Seminar is committed to evolving the Young Cultural Leaders Forum into a global focal point for international exchange and innovation around, creative cultural entrepreneurship. Last year’s Young Cultural Leaders Forum brought together 47 young cultural leaders from 37 countries around the globe for an intensive leadership development program. Participants returning this year from the Forum included: Sebastian Chan, Lilli Geissendorfer, Patricia Garza, Jimena Lara Estrada, Niyati Mehta, Ayeh Naraghi, Leandro Olocco, Deniz Ova, Belisa Rodrigues, Beck Tench and Rüdiger Wassibauer. The Young Cultural Leaders Forum co-chair, Russell Willis Taylor, and faculty member Fielding Grasty were also in attendance. At the beginning of the session, Clare Shine, Vice President and Chief Program Officer at Salzburg Global Seminar, said creative thinking was organic to the work carried out by program staff. “We really believe and have had many years of programming around the transformative potential of the arts to improve livelihoods and quality of life, to revitalize the way we educate and to leverage completely undreamt of business opportunities into the future decades. “Entrepreneurs with this kind of skillset are an absolute force to be reckoned with and they will help politicians in their countries and mainstream businesses, just as much as they help civil society and community groups.” During this year’s strategy session, participants have consulted together and acted as a focus group on needs assessment, designing impact, fine-tuning program components, establishing effective networks, and measuring success. Global Views on Cultural Entrepreneurship On Sunday evening, participants were further introduced to the topic of cultural entrepreneurship with alternative global perspectives. Clare Shine moderated a fireside discussion on Global Views on Cultural Entrepreneurship, featuring contributions from Lyne Sneige Keyrouz, Belisa Rodrigues, Felipe Buitrago, and Lidia Varbanova. Ms Sneige Keyrouz, a freelancer and consultant on Cultural Affairs in the Middle East, discussed how a greater use of technology had led to more innovative ideas in the Middle East. She said that despite the social upheaval that had taken place in the region, the cultural sector had survived and was now thriving. Mr Buitrago, consultant of the Division of Cultural Affairs, Solidarity and Creativity at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), said decision-makers at banks had to start paying attention to creative industries and consider what’s next. He suggested the concept that they were beginning to move into a “knowledge economy”. Citing former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, he repeated his adage: “The empires of the future are the empires of the mind.” He suggested a lack of opportunities were being given to those in the creative industries, and that infrastructure needed to have better access and communication. Ms Rodrigues, General Manager of the African Arts Institute based in Cape Town, provided a working context of the creative industry in Africa and relevant success stories. She also discussed her role managing the day-to-day operations of the Arterial Network, a network she described as spending 80 per cent of energy helping to build. The Arterial Network is a pan-African association of artists, cultural activists, creative entrepreneurs and cultural policy experts represented in 40 African countries. The body’s aims include empowering civil society arts and cultural organizations in African countries and regions, developing effective and sustainable networks, and improving the working and living conditions of artists. Ms Varbanova’s presentation focused on Central and Eastern Europe. With over 20 years of professional experience, and a portfolio focused on strategy, entrepreneurship and organizational development, she suggested the region needed to rebrand itself through cultural entrepreneurship. However, she went on to describe how the region – made up of 29 countries – was very broad and each country had its own issues to resolve with regards to the cultural sector. These included a lack of mechanisms to support this sector through public policy and a lack of funding. Speaking about cultural entrepreneurship in more detail, she encouraged artists to rid their fears of balance sheets and understand the business aspect of their careers. Action plan Participants spent much of Monday and Tuesday working within small groups. Discussions ranged from the strengths and weaknesses of the Young Cultural Leaders Forum to the greatest needs in the sector and what future participants should be exposed to. Questions were raised as to how public policy could better support the cultural sector, and what entailed being a cultural entrepreneur. The session came to an end on Tuesday afternoon after participants finalized a project plan, reviewed the main ideas generated during the planning meeting and mapped out the next steps for translating the project plan into action. Susanna Seidl-Fox, Salzburg Global Seminar’s Program Director for Culture and the Arts, described the session as a useful exercise with a lot of notes to take away from. "Having a cohort come from last year and having the prospect of a multi-year project going forward, I can really see a different and more powerful dynamic coming out of that which I just find really exciting. "I hope we can harness all of the good energy [and] the good ideas that have come along." Benjamin Glahn, European Development Director at Salzburg Global Seminar, said he was excited by the participants' contributions and ideas to follow up. "We look forward to going back, looking at the program design, incorporating the ideas and concepts - and some of the cautions too - that you all had for us. "It is a unique privilege to be able to convene a group like this together: the richness of experience and perspective of ideas that have come out are extraordinary."
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Turi Munthe: Serving the News Market and Democracy
Turi Munthe: Serving the News Market and Democracy
Louise Hallman 
Iran, June 2009: the “green revolution” is mid-swing. Young Iranians take to the streets to protest the presidential election results that sees Mahmoud Ahmadinejad win a second term in office and the Revolutionary Guards with their volunteer militia force, the Basij, heavy-handily try to put down the protests. Western media are refused access – how to tell the story? That was Demotix’s first front-page photo. Demotix – a play on the word Greek work “demotic” meaning “of the people” – is a citizen photo, video and news agency, launched in January 2009. “It emerged out of two linked but separate realizations,” explains founder and former CEO, Turi Munthe, speaking following his participation as a faculty member at the Salzburg Global Seminar session ‘Power In Whose Palm: The Digital Democratization of Photography’ (February 23-27, 2013), where he spoke on the panel ‘The Brave New World: Democratization, Decentralization and Citizen Journalism’. “The first was that the media being produced was out of an ever-shrinking number of sources... On the other side…I was very interested in the ideas of freedom, freedom of speech, freedom of community as a political tool,” the former foreign correspondent and Middle East analyst elaborates. “Two big problems. Was there any way of putting these two things together? That’s where Demotix initiated from. We tried to create two things: One, create a free, safe platform for people anywhere to tell stories which were being told, trying to address the issue of the freedom of speech; two, feed those grassroots, local story-tellers into the mainstream media, trying to address the issue of news-sourcing.” This wasn’t to just be a free, altruistic exercise – Demotix was set up from the beginning to be a business. “We would take your story, uploaded from the backstreets of Bamako, and when we sold it to the New York Times, we’d split whatever we could sell it for 50/50. The idea behind that was that we would be able to create a business virtuous circle, where we could not only supply completely different news stories into the mainstream media, from locals, by locals, telling local stories, with a very different voice from those already told, and on the other hand, incentivize citizen journalism, which I think is a fundamental necessity for democracy,” says Munthe. Filling a gap in the market… Demotix has proven to fill a much needed gap in the market. “In June 2009, during the aborted Iranian uprising, every foreign journalist was arrested, all the locals were forbidden to leave or produce any of their work. I had friends whose materials were taken away, who were put in solitary confinement, not allowed into the country,” Munthe remembers. “There was a complete lock-down on any kind of foreign, any kind of news, coming out of Iran. We had about two dozen local Iranians on the streets of Tehran, shipping us news and photos. We had Google accounts; we tried to push them through a proxy network, which didn’t work because the internet was being so slowed. But that was our first front page of the New York Times. And ever since, we’ve grown.” Since its launch over four years ago, Demotix has grown to a community of 30,000 contributors in 212 territories, generating about 150 news stories a day. It has established publishing and sales agreements with a whole host of media outlets across the world including the BBC, Le Monde, Bild, TIME, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Grazia magazine and The Guardian, as well as a network of photo resellers in almost 40 countries. It was bought over by photo agency, Corbis, a move that was hailed by Munthe in 2012 as “an enormous step towards our goal of becoming a truly competitive international photojournalism agency.” …But pushing out the professionals? But if Demotix is filling a gap in the market with amateurs’ photos, is that not crowding out the professional photographers? After all, it’s much cheaper for a newspaper to buy an image from a newswire than it is to pay the salary of either a staff or freelance photographer. “On the contrary,” insists Munthe. “Demotix started as a fairly idealistic project and part of that idealism is to ensure that as many people as possible can get involved in the business of journalism. I’m myself a journalist and I’m aware of how much work it takes and that journalism needs to be paid for. “Demotix is a business and we’ve gone out of our way not just to maintain, but to stick with, the high level of prices.” By providing a collective as well as a route to market, Munthe believes Demotix photographers (despite ceding half of their photographs’ value to the organization’s brokerage charges) earn more than if they tried to sell them alone. Also, given Demotix’s process of verification, they have earned the trust of many media publications and outlets – something a freelancer might have to work years at building. Every image sold on by Demotix is “verified and edited and checked by us,” says Munthe. In search of authenticity and authority “That’s an absolutely critical part of what we do, since we don’t just download Twitter or Facebook and ship it through. We’ve been very careful… We’ve actually added as many obstacles as possible to people uploading photos, since news is difficult and we don’t want pictures of cats and sunsets and flowers and babies. What we want and what we get unfortunately is what’s really happening in the world, so far as earthquakes and accidents and wars. All of that work needs to be very, very carefully checked.” At Demotix, their verification process is based in round-the-clock technical and human solutions. “We have a combination of tech and straight-up human processes so that every single picture that goes through Demotix has been checked and edited by an individual editor. We’re using a series of algorithms to understand who is who in our community. We’ve a series of tech filters, which check every single image, for what we’ve been told by the contributor and for what the meta-data can tell us. Finally and most importantly, we have a human network which is global and online 24/7/365 to make sure each image is correct,” he explains. “Touching wood, as far as I remember, we have not yet sold an image we then had to retract,” says Munthe, with some relief. “We’ve certainly published images [on the Demotix website] we had to retract, for all sorts of reasons. Unfortunately it’s something that happens on a daily basis to all the big news wires and it’s even more important for us. As a starting business, it’s absolutely critical that our clients can rely on us… “The only reason journalists have any worth is because their readers, or their viewers, or their spectators, believe what they say.” Culture shift In addition to filling a gap in the need for photography form some of the world’s most volatile and inaccessible places, citizen journalism outfits like Demotix, maintains Munthe, also fill mainstream media’s growing need for authenticity and authority, owing to a “cultural shift” not only in how news outlets produce news but also in how we, the viewer and reader, consume and digest news. Perhaps it’s a sign of growing general media literacy or part of a wider distrust of authority and increasing sense of democracy, but many consumers are turning away from the traditional mainstream media in favor of their own social networks and the “real” footage they see on sites such as YouTube. “Fifteen years it would have been inconceivable for the BBC to run anything other than a high-definition, super-edited clip of one of their top correspondents, declaiming to his supine audience what the story of the attack on Kabul was,” says Munthe. “Today, broadcasters go out of their way, to broadcast hand-held mobile footage. And there you see a real shift, between the trust in authority—which is the trust-in-the-John-Simpson model—through to trust in this shaky hand-held footage, which suggests that it’s real, that it’s authentic.” This shift, Munthe says, is being mirrored in many areas of culture, from the demise of the Encyclopedia Britannica in the face of the rise of the collaborative online project of Wikipedia, to the proliferation of reality TV shows in lieu of high production dramas. The democratization of news gathering brought about by dual forces of necessity—the demise of traditional news media’s budget, and opportunity—the ubiquitous digital camera and mobile communications, has shifted some power into the palms of the consumer. But despite his business being built on that, Munthe still has reservations. “In many ways that’s wonderful and talks to this ever-growing sense of empowerment that people feel they have to contribute to the news and to get involved in the discourse on what’s going on,” says Munthe. “But I also feel, one of the problems is when you disenfranchise the idea of authority, you put knowledge on an equal footing, which is of course an absurdity… “I think that this shift towards a trust in what is authentic, away from what is authoritative, is fabulous in many ways, but I also think it’s deeply problematic and deeply needs redressing…for the news industry, including photography and photojournalism, to really thrive.” Turi Munthe stepped down from his role as CEO of Demotix to pursue new opportunities shortly after this interview was conducted.
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Zanele Moholi: "We don’t document for fun... I have a collective calling"
Zanele Moholi: "We don’t document for fun... I have a collective calling"
Louise Hallman 
South Africa is the only Africa country where not only is homosexuality not illegal, same-sex couples can also marry and adopt children, and are legally protected under anti-discrimination legislation. But this masks the horrors faced by many lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered South Africans. Through the medium of photography, one South African “visual activist” aims to show the truth of what it is like to live as a black lesbian in the country. “I’m a visual activist before I’m a photographer, before I’m an artist,” says the award winner photographer Zanele Muholi. The 40-year-old was selected as a Fellow for the Salzburg Global session ‘Power in Whose Palm? The Digital Democratization of Photography’ in February; her focus on black lesbians and dedication to the visual documentation of her community led to her being invited back as a member of the faculty for the session ‘LGBT and Human Rights: New Challenges, Next Steps’. Despite all the supposed legal protections the LGBT community receives in the increasingly prosperous southern African country, lesbians, especially black lesbians, are frequently subjected to “corrective rape” attacks, where often gangs of men pin down and sexually assault lesbians in attempts to “cure” them of their homosexuality. Some of these attacks have led to the death of their victims. As South Africa struggles to combat its high level of crime, these attacks often go unprosecuted. Speaking to Salzburg Global after the Power of Photography session in February, Muholi explained why she believes photographing this marginalized group is important: “If I even talk about the work that I’m doing on black lesbians, I’m not doing it for myself. I’m doing it for the younger generation; I’m doing it for the older generation, who never, who were never even given the opportunity to open their mouths.” Muholi has been widely acclaimed for her work. In March, Muholi was honored in London at Index on Censorship awards – which seek to “celebrate the fundamental right to write, blog, tweet, speak out, protest and create art and literature and music” – for her “courage and the powerful statements made by her work”. Accepting the award, Muholi said she hopes that her work helps other lesbians in South Africa. “The minute you see likeness is when you realize that no matter what you're going through in your own life, you are not alone,” she said. Capturing history The black lesbian sees her work as part of a wider effort to document black history in the post-Apartheid country. “The issue of black history is a very, very sensitive one, because you deal with a community that is ever degraded, if not excluded from mainstream spaces… “In South Africa, my focus has ever been on black lesbians, on black gays, on black trans-men. And why black specifically is because as black people, they don’t have a tangible history that is captured by us on us,” Muholi explained. “So my approach is that of an insider, and I know that it’s possible to do other races, but it’s easy for me to start with a community that I understand…and so doing it, unapologetically. “For many times, we have people who write our history on our behalf as if we did not exist, so this is my time, this is my terms and it is possible, or it should be, for us to do it on our own terms, in a way we fully understand. “We cannot always expect people to do things for us,” the photographer elaborated. “For the longest time, black history had been captured by the outsiders, as if we never existed. From our mothers to our fathers, to our great-grandfathers… I think one has to find ways to re-write the history, for our own great-grandchildren. For them to know that we were once here and for them to understand fully the resistance and other struggles, that we still encounter…now.” The Salzburg Global session on photography heard from many photographers who have used photography as a means for activism. Bangladeshi photographer Shahidul Alam’s exhibition ‘Crossfire’ exposed the extrajudicial killings of the Rapid Action Battalion to a wider international audience. Despite the accolades he has received for his photography, Alam says he simply works with the medium best suited to social activism. If something better comes along, he explains, he’ll change his medium and tactics. “Beyond me documenting in South Africa, the lessons and information I learned here, I can take back home and apply, so photography, films, audio-materials can be better used for advocacy work,” Muholi said on the last day of the session. “Other people may have different notions of how they perceive their photos as art; they don’t understand how you could push one political agenda using the very same.” Photography proves particularly persuasive in countries and communities where literacy is not yet high, said Muholi. “You don’t need to speak any special language in order for others to understand fully what’s going on. If you see a dead man, that doesn’t matter what language. If you see a person in shackles, [language] doesn’t matter.” Beyond posterity So, when she takes her photographs, is she doing it for posterity, or is it part of an agenda, an activism for the current space? “[My work] is beyond posterity,” said Muholi. “It’s for current reference, for use by scholars and other fanatics… We’re talking about the now, so it’s sort of like capturing the visual presence, which then becomes a visual history… To say, yes we are here.” In addition to her photography, Muholi also blogs and is a prominent voice in a growing community of queer and queer-focused artists in South Africa. She sees the work of her own and that of the community as more than just art – it is a vital part of the activism needed to counter the extreme prejudice faced by the LGBT community in the country. “We are dealing with human beings who are being violated and raped, simply because we express the sexuality we do. They’re at risk of either losing their lives, or being curatively raped, like how people assume, if you rape a lesbian, she’ll become a straight woman.” When speaking with Muholi, her anger at the situation is glaringly apparent. As a member of the black lesbian community, these are issues that she feels personally; she is not some neutral observer as some photographers and photojournalists try to be. (This neutral stance was perhaps most notable in the late Kevin Carter’s Pulitzer prize-winning photograph of the starving Sudanese girl stalked by a waiting vulture.) Whilst at the seminar in Salzburg, Muholi received news from a friend in Cape Town that another black lesbian had been killed because of her sexuality. Muholi and her photography collective have been photographing and documenting the funerals of such victims. “We don’t document for fun, or just because we have powers and cameras. With my team, I have a collective calling; we document all of these atrocities because we want the world to know that we have a situation at hand.” As the Open Society Foundation recently wrote in their publication on South African artists using their work to tackle social injustice, “Through her work, she shines a spotlight on her community – forcing everyone to acknowledge that they are ‘normal’, that what they do is ‘beautiful’, that who they are is ‘human’ – just like everyone else.” It is normality and acceptance, as well as an end to persecution that Muholi strives for. Just as the oppressive regime of apartheid was ended in South Africa in 1994, Muholi hopes to see the end of the persecution of the LGBT community in her country, and believes photography can be a tactic in doing so, bringing the plight of her community to the attention of the wider national and international consciousness. “We call upon those with powers to agitate with us, just like the people who worked with activists in South Africa to end apartheid and I think the same strategies could be used,” she said, angrily hopeful. Salzburg Global's photography session was named “Power in Whose Palm?” Apt for Muholi, who is determined to ensure the camera in her hands and the photography she produces is indeed powerful. See more of Zanele Muholi's work on her website
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The Role of Arts Organizations in Society and their Place in Communities
The Role of Arts Organizations in Society and their Place in Communities
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 
The final panel presentation of of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders focussed on the topic of 'The Role of Arts Organizations in Society and their Place in Communities'. Sharing their experiences with their younger Fellows were co-chair Mulenga Kapwepwe, chair of the National Arts Council in Zambia, Tisa Ho, executive director of the Hong Kong Arts Festival and Eduardo Vilaro, artisitc director at Ballet Hispanico in the USA. Speaking to seminar partner, National Arts Strategies' Dallas Shelby, Ho, Vilaro and Kapwepwe gave their opinions on the key questions with our Young Cultural Leaders, as ever, responding. What is the place of cultural institutions within their communities? Kar Kuan Ng, Executive Director of the Hong Kong Arts Festival suggests that to be truly relevant an organization must be "in, of, for and about" its community. What is the role of arts organizations in society? Eduardo Vilaro, Artistic Director of Ballet Hispanico stresses the importance of art as a connector and being true to your mission. What is the role of an arts and culture leader in today's society? Mulenga Kapwepwe, Chairperson of the National Arts Council of Zambia and co-chair of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders, suggests that arts leaders are best equipped to shape the future. How can cultural organizations work with their communities rather than for their communities? Kapwepwe discusses how widening your definitions can broaden your understanding of community. The Role of Arts Organizations in Society: Discussion Points Fellows of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders talk about the day's discussion around the role of arts organizations in society and their place in the community.  
You can see more videos on the National Arts Strategies channel:
http://www.youtube.com/user/ArtsStrategies/, The YCI Webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org and you can follow all the discussions in real time on our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list: https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498
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'Glocal' - What is Global and What is Local in Today's World?
'Glocal' - What is Global and What is Local in Today's World?
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 
The second full of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders focussed on the topic of 'Glocal - what is global and what is local in today's world?'. Sharing their experiences with their younger Fellows were Serhan Ada, Head of the Cultural Management Program at Istanbul Bilgi University, Mikel Ellcessor, General Manager of public radio station WDET in Detroit, and Yudhishthir Raj Isar, Professor of Cultural Policy Studies at the American University of Paris and Eminent Research Visitor at the Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney. Speaking to seminar partner, National Arts Strategies' Dallas Shelby, Isar, Ellcessor and Ada gave their opinions on the key questions with our Young Cultural Leaders responding. How do arts and culture institutions deal with issues of cultural identity? Yudhishthir Raj Isar, professor of Cultural Policy Studies at The American University of Paris talks about the responsibility that arts and culture organizations have to provide cultural translation. How do cultural institutions balance being global and local? Mikel Ellcessor, General Manager of WDET in Detroit, warns that social media can give us a false sense of connection. He also gives a suggestion for how to make meaningful connections in one's community. How have the forces of globalization impacted the nature of cultural activity? Serhan Ada, Head of the Cultural Management Program at Istanbul Bilgi University, suggest that the "new normal" favors the creative. Fellows of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders talk about the day's discussion around the effects of globalization on culture.

You can see more videos on the National Arts Strategies channel:
http://www.youtube.com/user/ArtsStrategies/, the YCI webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org/ and you can follow all the discussions in real time on our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list: https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498
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How Do You Communicate the Value of Arts and Culture?
How Do You Communicate the Value of Arts and Culture?
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 

Sunday, October 27 saw the opening plenary discussions of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders. Tackling the topic of 'The Creation and the Communication of Value' were Gary Vikan, Director of the Walters Museum of Art, Deirdre Prins-Solani, an independent heritage and cultural expert in South Africa, and Patrick McIntyre, Executive Director of the Sydney Theatre Company. Below, they share their opinions on the key questions, with our Young Cultural Leaders giving their response. What can science tell us about the art experience? Gary Vikan, Director of the Walters Museum of Art on how neuroscience, evolutionary biology and the cave paintings in Lascaux might point to the fact that aesthetics is "hard-wired into our heads." How do we communicate the instrumental and intrinsic values of the arts? Vikan talks about the dangers of using economic impact as argument for the arts, the importance of articulating the intrinsic nature of the art experience and how neuroscience might unlock the mystery of that experience. What value does the arts create and how do we articulate it? Deirdre Prins-Solani, an independent heritage and cultural expert in South Africa talks about the interaction between the sacred and public spaces and how that tension creates value. What are the arguments for the arts that resonate with contemporary society? Patrick McIntyre, Executive Director of the Sydney Theatre Company on the need to talk about the arts in terms of its benefits rather than its features. What our Fellows think: The Creation and Communication of Value: Discussion Points
You can see more videos on the National Arts Strategies channel:
http://www.youtube.com/user/ArtsStrategies/, the YCI webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org/ and you can follow all the discussions in real time on our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list:  https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498
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Displaying results 106 to 112 out of 115

VOICES FROM YOUNG CULTURAL LEADERS

How should cultural institutions approach the creation and articulation of value?
Albino Jopela, archaelogist and lecturer at Eduardo Mondlane University in Mozambique suggests that considering the values of all of the stakeholders in a community will help ensure relevance and sustainability.


Why is it important for arts leaders to engage in cross-cultural conversations?
Jimena Lara Estrada, program coordinator for the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York, talks about connecting with other leaders and the hope that it instills.

How do you articulate value of arts in a society where it is largely seen as a commodity?
Eyad Houssami, founding director of Masrah Ensemble in Lebanon, talks about the challenges of making a case for the arts in a society where the concept of public value is very limited.

What role should orchestras play in their communities?
Mark Gillespie, general and artistic manager of Orchestra of the Americas and Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders Fellow, suggests that orchestras should connect with youth at a very early age so that musicians grow out of the community.